Sunday, June 29, 2014

Tulum Mexico on Mayan Riviera

Tulum Mexico on Mayan Riviera
El Castillo at Tulum, Mexico
Tulum is the archaeological site of a major Mayan port on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. It was located on both land and sea trade routes. An important product traded was obsidian, which is a glass-like substance made from volcanic lava. This product was used in making blades for work and war, as well as for art. The community was a place of commerce and worship with temples, administrative buildings and residences. A wall surrounded the community to separate the elites from the workers, and a second wall surrounded the temples to separate the priests from the elites. The walls still exist, and many of the stone buildings stand in various stages of disrepair. The archaeological site is readily accessible to visitors, and it is a popular destination for tourists.

The population of the community reached its peak between the 13th and 15th centuries. The maximum population was between 1000 and 1500. The community continued to exist through the Spanish conquest of Mexico. However, diseases from the Old World eventually led to the demise of the community.

US News Travel calls Tulum the #1 beach in Mexico. It has not been developed like other nearby beaches. Instead, bungalows are prevalent on the beach. The beaches are never over-crowded.

Tulum is located 80 miles south of Cancun on highway 307. Sherry and I visited the site while traveling on a ministry trip from Playa del Carmen to Chetumal. The combination of a major archaeological site and beautiful beaches make Tulum one of Mexico’s true jewels.


Tulum Mexico on Mayan Riviera


Tulum Mexico on Mayan Riviera


Tulum Mexico on Mayan Riviera


Tulum Mexico on Mayan Riviera





Thursday, May 1, 2014

Taos Pueblo: World Heritage Site

Taos Pueblo: World Heritage Site
Taos Pueblo: World Heritage Site
Taos Pueblo is a 1000-year-old community belonging to a Native American tribe of Pueblo people. It is one of the oldest continuously inhabited communities in the United States. Electricity and running water are not available in the pueblo. A small stream, Red Willow Creek, flows through the pueblo. The stream comes from Blue Lake on the pueblo’s protected mountainous area. The pueblo is near the city of Taos, New Mexico.

The pueblo people were fearless and persistently fought for their right to maintain their culture and land. They successfully revolted against the Spaniards. They fought for over six decades in order for the U.S. Congress to return Blue Lake and land adjacent to the pueblo.


The pueblo is a World Heritage Site and a National Historic Site. It is an amazing community to visit.
Taos Pueblo
Red Willow Creek in Taos Pueblo